Host-Cell Factors Involved in COVID-19 Infections May Augur Improved Treatments

By addressing molecules governing how host cells respond to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, researchers hope they’ve found a new therapeutic target less vulnerable to potential drug resistance and emerging variants of concern Researchers at University of California San Diego and UC Riverside have further elucidated the molecular pathway used by the SARS-CoV-2 virus to infect human

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Human spinal cord cell atlas provides foundation to study neurodegeneration, chronic pain, and other diseases

What New research offers clues about the biology of cells in the spinal cord that die off in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. A team of researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health found evidence linking motor neurons’ large cell size and supporting structure with the genes that underlie their vulnerability

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FDA Approves First Oral Treatment for Anemia Caused by Chronic Kidney Disease for Adults on Dialysis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Jesduvroq tablets (daprodustat) as the first oral treatment for anemia (decreased number of red blood cells) caused by chronic kidney disease for adults who have been receiving dialysis for at least four months. Jesduvroq is not approved for patients who are not on dialysis. Other FDA-approved treatments for

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Duke-NUS and NHCS scientists first in the world to regenerate diseased kidney

Blocking an immune-regulating protein reverses the damage caused by acute and chronic kidney disease, a preclinical study suggests. Led by scientists at Duke-NUS Medical School and the National Heart Centre Singapore, researchers in Singapore and Germany have found that renal tubular cells, which line the tiny tubes inside kidneys, release a scar-regulating protein called interleukin-11

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T lymphocytes engineering: advances in treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases, scarring and beyond

In recent months there have been some major jumps—unprecedented success stories—that indicate our ability to engineer T cells may well have a substantial impact for multiple medical conditions that have not been responsive to conventional therapies or for which there is no available treatment. This can be regarded as the quintessential individualized medicine intervention—specifically modifying

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Once-weekly efanesoctocog alfa beneficial in severe hemophilia A

Once weekly efanesoctocog alfa provides superior bleeding prevention to prestudy prophylaxis for patients with severe hemophilia A, according to a study published in the Jan. 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Annette von Drygalski, M.D., Pharm.D., from the University of California in San Diego, and colleagues conducted a phase 3 study involving patients

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Report highlights cost of misinformation to healthcare services during COVID-19 pandemic

A new report has highlighted the consequences of misinformation, including loss of trust in public institutions, delayed action on pressing issues such as climate change, and the financial toll on healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The ‘Fault Lines’ report involved a panel of international experts, including leading cognitive scientist Professor Stephan Lewandowsky, from the University of

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