Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine Targeting Fast-Spreading Omicron BA.1 and BA.4/5 will be delivered as soon as October 2022

Pfizer and BioNTech will begin trials of their updated mRNA Covid-19 vaccine designed to protect against the newer BA.4 and BA.5 sub-variants of the coronavirus latest this month, BioNTech announced on Monday, joining other vaccine makers like Moderna who are trying to create updated shots targeting the faster spreading and immune evasive variants. The trial

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Dysregulation of the kallikrein-kinin system and neutrophils role in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with severe COVID-19

Results published by University of Leuven researchers in eBioMedicine Markers of inflammation and coagulation are predictors for clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Binding of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 receptor, which is involved in kinin breakdown, could interfere with the kallikrein-kinin pathway. SARS-CoV-2 induced dysregulation

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12,7% COVID-19 patients develop long COVID symptoms: results of a large Dutch study

One in eight adults (12.7%) who are infected with SARS-CoV-2 experience long term symptoms due to COVID-19, suggests a large Dutch study published in The Lancet. The study provides one of the first comparisons of long-term symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection (often called ‘long COVID’) with symptoms in an uninfected population, as well as measuring symptoms in

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St. Jude Researchers improved CAR T-cell therapy for T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital developed a simple method to select for more effective cancer-destroying CAR T cells for patients with relapsed T-ALL. Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are improving chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. Their new simplified approach selected for an advantageous T-cell type and showed promise in the lab against relapsed T-cell

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Gene Therapy Approach Shows Promise in Treating ALS

In rodent models, introduced neuroprotective protein slowed disease progression and increased life span Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord responsible for voluntary movements and muscle control. In a new study, published July 11, 2022 in the journal Theranostics, researchers at

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Getting more exercise than guidelines suggest may lower death risk as much as 31%.

Doubling to quadrupling the minimum amount of weekly physical activity recommended for U.S. adults may substantially lower the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and other causes, new research finds. The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, found people who followed the minimum guidelines for moderate or vigorous long-term, leisure physical activity

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Vitamin D supplements data on fractures prevention are inconsistent: results of the VITAL trial in NEJM.

More research suggests it’s time to abandon the craze over vitamin D. Taking high doses of “the sunshine vitamin” doesn’t reduce the risk of broken bones in generally healthy older Americans, researchers reported Wednesday on NEJM . It’s the latest in a string of disappointments about a nutrient once hoped to have wide-ranging protective effects. That same

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Prognosis and persistence of smell and taste dysfunction in 5% patients with Covid-19: meta-analysis results published in The BMJ

About 5% of adults may develop long-lasting changes to their sense of smell or taste after COVID-19 infection, suggests research published by The BMJ today. With more than 550 million confirmed COVID-19 cases to date, this means that at least 15 million and 12 million adult patients may experience long-term smell and taste deficiencies, respectively. Given the

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SARS-CoV-2 Variants Have Developed Resistance to Human Interferons

CU Anschutz researchers examined how five SARS-CoV-2 variants interact with diverse interferons and found the virus has adapted to evade this important front-line defense of the innate immune system Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have investigated how antiviral proteins called interferons interact with SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19. The study, published in Proceedings

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The third COVID-19 booster was crucial to identifying and fighting new variants

Twenty different COVID-19 variants were effectively identified and neutralised after the third booster, according to the new study for which the University of Surrey provided the crucial antigenic map of variants of concern.  While the study’s results suggested that immunity decreases 20 weeks after vaccination, the third booster (of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, in the case

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Primary thromboprophylaxis in symptomatic outpatients with COVID-19: no benefit in two randomized trials 

Two trials show no differences between patients who received enoxaparin vs standard of care The routine use of antithrombotic therapies to prevent thromboembolic complications provided no benefit for symptomatic outpatients with COVID-19, according to the results of two randomized trials. In the OVID trial, the 30-day risk of hospitalization and death was similar among patients who

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Private clinics in Cyprus, Germany and Switzerland are offering expensive unproven “blood washing” procedures for abroad Long Covid patients

Thousands of people experiencing the debilitating symptoms of long covid are traveling abroad to seek costly but unproven treatments such as “blood washing”, according to an investigation carried out by The BMJ and ITV News released today. Patients are traveling to private clinics in Cyprus, Germany and Switzerland for apheresis – a blood-filtering treatment normally

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Acute and post-acute COVID-19 presentations in athletes: a systematic review and meta-analysis shows that 8% of athletes have persistent symptoms after contracting COVID-19

Researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil analyzed data from 43 scientific articles describing the effects of COVID-19 on athletes and concluded that while the disease was asymptomatic or mild in the vast majority of cases (94%), about 8% of the subjects concerned had persistent symptoms affecting their performance and potentially preventing

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New paper from Cleveland University Hospitals examines transfusion utilization and appropriateness: thinking differently at a tertiary academic medical center

Researchers find decrease in transfusions, increase in appropriate use, and savings of $2.5 million In a new paper, researchers from University Hospitals (UH) detail how they used data via a dashboard to decrease the use of packed red-blood cell (pRBC) transfusions and platelets with an increase in appropriate transfusions.Their paper, “Transfusion Utilization and Appropriateness: Thinking Differently

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A new study confirms convalescent plasma doesn’t benefit severely ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19

Convalescent plasma, widely given to severely ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19 during the pandemic, does not improve their ability to survive or recover, according to a national clinical trial led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center and published in the journal CHEST. The multicenter blinded, randomized placebo-controlled, Passive Immunity Trial for our Nation (PassITON), looked at the

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COVID-19 virus spike protein flexibility improved by human cell’s own modifications

When the coronavirus causing COVID-19 infects human cells, the cell’s protein-processing machinery makes modifications to the spike protein that render it more flexible and mobile, which could increase its ability to infect other cells and to evade antibodies, a new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign found. The researchers created an atomic-level computational model

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Small NIH study reveals how immune response triggered by COVID-19 may damage the brain

Findings could give insight into long-term neurological symptoms of COVID-19 A study from the National Institutes of Health describes the immune response triggered by COVID-19 infection that damages the brain’s blood vessels and may lead to short- and long-term neurological symptoms. In a study published in Brain, researchers from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and

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Charité researchers simulate coronavirus infection using human lungs and organoids

A team of Berlin-based researchers have simulated SARS-CoV-2 infection in human lungs, thereby generating key insights into the mechanisms involved. Using cultured lung tissue samples, the researchers showed that the virus responsible for COVID-19 has only limited capacity for directly infecting cells within human alveoli. The majority of viruses which reach the lungs are ingested by macrophages (cells of

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Efficacy and safety of CD19-specific CAR T cell–based therapy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with CNSL

CNS relapse is still a common cause of treatment failure in R/R B-ALL, although chemotherapy, cranial irradiation, and allo-HSCT are all modalities that can be incorporated into the management of CNSL. In the present study, published on Blood by a team of Xuzhou Medical University, was reported the efficacy, toxicity, and clinical feasibility of CD19-specific

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First successful treatment of severe pulmonary hypertension using umbilical cord stem cells

Hannover Medical School doctors successfully treat three-year-old girl / Publication in “Nature Cardiovascular Research“ Clinical researchers at Hannover Medical School (MHH) have succeeded for the first time worldwide in stopping the usually fatal course of the disease in severe pulmonary hypertension thanks to a novel therapeutic approach. A three-year-old girl suffering from so-called pulmonary arterial

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Colorado University New Study Paves Way to Better Understanding and Treating Long COVID

Researchers are first to link COVID-specific T Cells to lung function, Long COVID A new study published in today’s issue of PLoS Pathogens is the first to link SARS-CoV-2 specific T cells to lung function and those who suffer from long-term COVID symptoms. Long COVID currently affects hundreds of millions of Americans. The study found that patients suffering

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Heart Failure Patients Unvaccinated Against COVID-19 Are Three Times More Likely to Die From It Than Boosted Heart Failure Patients

Mount Sinai study shows dramatic protective effects of vaccination in this high-risk population, which often demonstrates vaccine hesitancy Heart failure patients who are unvaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, are three times more likely to die if infected with the virus compared to fully boosted heart failure patients, according to new research out

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People in US Republican Counties Were More Likely to Die From COVID-19, University of Maryland-led Analysis Shows

The partisan divide in the United States throughout the COVID-19 pandemic has stretched beyond differences in attitudes about masking, social distancing and vaccines. According to a new study led by a University of Maryland researcher, it also is tied to a clear difference in mortality rates from the virus. In the study, published today in Health

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Growing US ‘Mortality Gap’ Detected Between Republican and Democratic Counties

A new study highlights how closely connected politics and health outcomes have grown over time. Investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital examined mortality rates and federal and state election data for all counties in the U.S. from 2001 to 2019. The team found what they call a “mortality gap” — a widening difference between age-adjusted death rates

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Recent progress in cell therapy research: a review in Nature outlines engineering disciplines, genome and epigenome editing, synthetic biology and biomaterial-mediated immune modulation.

Given recent progress in cell therapy research, it is clear that the engineering disciplines outlined in this Review will play an increasing role in the creation of new product pipelines with improved safety, efficacy and accessibility for patients. Recent scientific advances have not only demonstrated the potential impact of technologiesdeveloped by each of these fields,

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Study: Patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia treated with leukotriene inhibitors are more likely to survive, University of Buffalo researchers find

In a retrospective study based on big data, the researchers found that Leukotriene Inhibitors (LTI)s prevented death in COVID-19 patients with low oxygen saturation University at Buffalo biomedical informatics researchers have found that patients hospitalized with COVID-19 pneumonia had a 13.5% survival advantage when treated with a combination of leukotriene inhibitors (LTIs) and the steroid

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‘Cell pores’ discovery and a new drug give hope to millions of brain and spinal cord injury patients

Scientists from the University of Birmingham have shown an existing drug may reduce damage after spinal cord injury, by blocking the inflammatory response in the spinal cord. Their research, published today in Clinical and Translational Medicine, demonstrates that AZD1236, a drug developed by AstraZeneca, can significantly reduce “secondary damage” caused by the body’s response to spinal

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Amyloid production induced by neutrophil elastase as possible mechanism behind enigmatic symptoms in Severe Covid-19

In severe covid-19 and long-term covid, disorders of blood coagulation often occur. Now, researchers at LiU have discovered that the body’s immune system can affect the nail protein on the surface of the sars-cov-2 virus so that it forms misfolded protein, so-called amyloid. The findings point to a possible link between harmful amyloid formation and covid-19 symptoms.

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BWH Scientists Develop ‘Off the Shelf’ Engineered Stem Cells to Treat Aggressive Glioblastoma

Glioblastomas (GBMs) are highly aggressive cancerous tumors of the brain and spinal cord. Brain cancers like GBM are challenging to treat because many cancer therapeutics cannot pass through the blood-brain barrier, and more than 90 percent of GBM tumors return after being surgically removed, despite surgery and subsequent chemo- and radiation therapy being the most

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University of Minnesota technology allows amputees to control a robotic arm with their mind

Research team makes mind-reading possible with electronics and AI University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers have developed a more accurate, less invasive technology that allows amputees to move a robotic arm using their brain signals instead of their muscles.  Many current commercial prosthetic limbs use a cable and harness system that is controlled by the

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90-Day Clinical Outcome of Critically Ill Hospitalized Covid-19 Patients Treated with Imatinib: lower mortality rate, shorter duration of invasive ventilation and more ventilator free days.

Patients with severe COVID-19 who were given imatinib had lower mortality rates at 90-day follow-up, according to research published at the ATS 2022 international conference. The study investigated the long-term efficacy of imatinib in hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the Netherlands as part of the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled CounterCOVID study. A tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib is currently an oncology

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Identifying who has long COVID in the USA: a machine learning approach using N3C data

Using machine learning, researchers find patterns in electronic health record data to better identify those likely to have the condition. Long COVID is marked by wide-ranging symptoms, including shortness of breath, fatigue, fever, headaches, “brain fog” and other neurological problems. Such symptoms can last for many months or longer after an initial COVID-19 diagnosis. One

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SARS-CoV-2 superantigens could be involved in Severe acute pediatric hepatitis, following a letter on The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Recently, there have been reports of children with a severe acute form of hepatitis in the UK, Europe, the USA, Israel, and Japan.  Most patients present with gastrointestinal symptoms and then progress to jaundice and, in some cases, acute liver failure. So far, no common environmental exposures have been found, and an infectious agent remains

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New type of cell therapy can repair damaged heart tissue after infarction

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet, Technical University of Munich (TUM) in Germany and AstraZeneca, among others, have identified a new type of cell therapy with the potential to heal injuries to the heart after a heart attack. The preclinical study, published in the journal Nature Cell Biology, shows that so-called ventricular progenitor cells can stimulate the heart’s

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FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Launches New Accelerating Rare disease Cures (ARC) Program

FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) has announced the launch of the new Accelerating Rare disease Cures (ARC) Program. The goal of the CDER ARC Program is to speed and increase the development of effective and safe treatment options addressing the unmet needs of patients with rare diseases. Launched in May 2022, CDER’s Accelerating Rare disease

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Feces of people with mild COVID can harbor viral genetic material months after infection: can it be responsible for Long Covid ?

People with mild to moderate COVID-19 can shed viral RNA in their feces months after initial infection, Stanford researchers find. Those who do often have nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. If you’re relying on nasal or throat-based tests to give you a clean bill of health after a COVID-19 infection, you might be swabbing the

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Novel Supramolecular CRISPR–Cas9 Carrier Enables More Efficient Genome Editing

Fifth generation polyrotaxane (PRX) carriers can effectively deliver CRISPR-Cas9 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) The PRX carrier can cross the cell membrane, avoid endosomal action, and release Cas9 RNP for entry into the nucleusImage courtesy: Kumamoto University, The carriers, aminated polyrotaxanes, can flexibly and reversibly bind with Cas9 ribonucleoprotein and protect it from intracellular endosomal degradation CRISPR-Cas9 is

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A new study published in JAMA Psychiatry suggests neuropsychiatric sequelae similar for severe COVID-19 and Severe Acute Respiratory Infection

The neuropsychiatric sequelae are similar for severe COVID-19 infection and for other severe acute respiratory infections (SARI), according to a study published online May 11 in JAMA Psychiatry. Ashley Kieran Clift, M.B.B.S., from the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and colleagues quantified the risks of new-onset neuropsychiatric conditions and new neuropsychiatric medication prescriptions after discharge from

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A Lancet follow-up study shows half of people hospitalized with COVID-19 have at least one symptom two years after infection

Two years after infection with COVID-19, half of patients who were admitted to hospitals still have at least one symptom, according to the longest follow-up study to date, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. The study followed 1,192 participants in China infected with SARS-CoV-2 during the first phase of the pandemic in 2020. While physical and

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Lloviu virus, a new possible zoonotic pandemic threat isolated for the first time in European bats

Researchers from the Medway School of Pharmacy (a partnership between the universities of Kent and Greenwich) have helped isolate the Lloviu virus (LLOV) – a close relative of Ebola virus – for the first time, highlighting the need for future research to ensure pandemic preparedness. LLOV is part of the filovirus family – which includes the Ebola

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The death of the patient transplanted with gene-edited pig heart could be due to a porcine Cytomegalovirus

The pig heart transplanted into an American patient earlier this year in a landmark operation carried a porcine virus that may have derailed the experiment and contributed to his death two months later, say transplant specialists. David Bennett Sr. was near death in January when he received a genetically edited pig heart in a pioneering between-species transplant

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Inspection at the IHU-Méditerranée Infection and the AP-HM: the French National Agency for Medicines Safety (ANSM) takes legal action again and initiates administrative proceedings

ANSM is publishing the final reports of the inspection conducted at the Institut hospitalo universitaire-Méditerranée Infection de Marseille (IHU) and at the Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Marseille (AP-HM), following reports in the context of our whistleblower system. The inspection reveals serious shortcomings and non-compliances with the regulations for research involving the human person (RIPH) , in particular

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Nearly 13 Percent of COVID-19 Hospitalized Patients Had Serious Neurologic Symptoms

Overwhelming evidence shows that infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV-2) causes dysfunction of multiple organ systems, including the nervous system. Neurologic symptoms are frequently reported even in patients with mild illness and for some, these neurologic symptoms may persist as part of long-haul COVID. To describe the prevalence, associated risk factors and outcomes of

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Pathophysiological pathway differences in children who present with COVID-19 ARDS compared to COVID -19 induced MIS-C

Researchers have discovered the blood clotting and immune protein pathways that are activated in severe cases of COVID-19 in children, paving the way for earlier diagnosis and more targeted treatments. The study led by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and the University of Melbourne and published in Nature Communications, has identified disease mechanisms in children with COVID-19

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Acute Hepatitis and Adenovirus Infection Among Children No Covid link found by CDC in Alabama cases

During October–November 2021, clinicians at a children’s hospital in Alabama identified five pediatric patients with severe hepatitis and adenovirus viremia upon admission. In November 2021, hospital clinicians, the Alabama Department of Public Health, the Jefferson County Department of Health, and CDC began an investigation. This activity was reviewed by CDC and conducted consistent with applicable

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Comparison of Home Antigen Testing With RT-PCR and Viral Culture During the Course of SARS-CoV-2 Infection

If you have Covid-19 symptoms but test negative with a rapid antigen test, you should test again 1-2 days later, or on day four of feeling crook, new research suggests. A study out of the United States, conducted between January-May 2021 and published in JAMA Internal Medicine on Saturday, compared the PCR and RAT results of 225​ children

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Financial risks posed by unproven cell interventions in Japan

The research group led by Professor Misao Fujita conducted a study to estimate the total amount of refund the Japanese government would pay if a patient received unproven cell interventions and applied for a medical expense deduction. Some regenerative medicines whose safety and efficacy have not been fully confirmed in clinical trials and other studies are offered

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Combination Respiratory Vaccine Containing Recombinant SARS-CoV-2 Spike and Quadrivalent Seasonal Influenza Hemagglutinin Nanoparticles results effective in animals trials

On Wednesday, Maryland-based vaccine manufacturer Novavax released preliminary results from an early clinical phase study of its combination Covid/flu vaccine. The results found that the combination vaccine produced immune responses in patients that were comparable to those of its standalone flu and Covid vaccines. The company also found the vaccine formulation to be safe, with

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Covid-19: Antidepressant Fluvoxamine Found to Be Effective as a therapy by Mc Gill University researchers

Researchers say the drug fluvoxamine is effective as an outpatient treatment for COVID-19. Experts say fluvoxamine could widen access to COVID-19 treatments, although they expect it to be a somewhat minor tool in the medical community’s toolkit. They also note that more studies need to be done on fluvoxamine’s effectiveness against the Omicron variant. Fluvoxamine,

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Regenerative Potential of Solid Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate Compared to Platelet-Rich Fibrin

A new study compares the regenerative potential of blood/bone marrow aspirate concentrates obtained from arterial blood, venous blood, and bone marrow aspirate. The study, conducted in rabbits, is reported in the peer-reviewed journal Tissue Engineering Part A. Blood concentrate material such as platelet-rick fibrin (PRF) is used in clinical practice to promote tissue regeneration in the

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Three in ten survivors with COVID-19 developed a subset of symptoms associated with “Long Covid”: study of UCLA shows

New UCLA research finds that 30% of people treated for COVID-19 developed Post Acute Sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC), most commonly known as “Long COVID.” People with a history of hospitalization, diabetes, and higher body mass index were most likely to develop the condition, while those covered by Medicaid, as opposed to commercial health insurance, or

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What impacts has Covid-19 had on children: CDC study shows 87% Of Kids Hospitalized During Omicron Wave Were Unvaccinated.

About 87% of children hospitalized with Covid-19 when the omicron variant was dominant were unvaccinated, according to a study released Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, offering a stark reminder of the risks of leaving children unvaccinated. KEY FACTS From mid-December to late February, unvaccinated children ages 5 to 11 had a hospitalization rate

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3% of adults with COVID pneumonia develop new-onset dementia

Three percent of 10,403 adults with COVID-19 pneumonia were diagnosed as having new-onset dementia after a median of 182 days, a significantly higher proportion than that observed with other types of pneumonia, finds a study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases. University of Missouri at Columbia researchers conducted a case series of COVID-19 pneumonia patients along

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COVID-19 therapy: better in combination than alone. Research published by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and Freie Universität (FU).

How a well-known drug can become a game changer There is a steadily growing arsenal of drugs for COVID-19. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and Freie Universität (FU) Berlin have studied the mechanisms of action of antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs. Their findings, which have been published in Molecular Therapy, show

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New York State Department of Health Announces Emergence of Recently Identified, Highly Contagious Omicron Subvariants in New York and Urges Continued Vigilance Against COVID-19

The New York State Department of Health today announced the emergence of two Omicron subvariants in New York State, BA.2.12 and BA.2.12.1. Both variants are sub-lineages of BA.2, which now accounts for 80.6% of COVID-19 infections in New York. The subvariants have been estimated to have a 23% – 27% growth advantage above the original BA.2 variant.

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Cell-Derived Exosome Therapy May Help Repair Abnormal Heart Rhythm

Cedars-Sinai Investigators Found It Also Reduced Scarred Heart Tissue in Animals Vesicles secreted from human heart cells may repair damaged tissue and prevent lethal heart rhythm disorders, according to a new study from investigators in the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai. The research, published in the European Heart Journal, could lead to a new way to

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Cell Treatment Slows Disease in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients

Cell Therapy Developed by Smidt Heart Institute Leader Delays Disease Progression in Patients Who Have Few Treatment Options A cell therapy developed by the executive director of the Smidt Heart Institute stabilizes weakened muscles–including the heart muscle–in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, a new study published in the international peer-reviewed journal The Lancet shows. If the HOPE-2 study’s

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University of Manitoba researchers develop new stem cell therapy for treating spinal cord injuries

A new study by University of Manitoba researchers has developed a stem cell-based therapy that may eventually lead to new regenerative treatments for people with spinal cord injuries. Dr. Soheila Karimi, professor of physiology and pathophysiology at the Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, and her colleagues have developed a treatment strategy that

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Aprotinin is effective in COVID-19 patients: Ciudad Real University researchers clinical trial confirms previous data of Goethe and Kent University

A clinical study from Spain recently confirmed laboratory experiments made by researchers of Goethe University Frankfurt and University of Kent who showed that the protease inhibitor aprotinin prevented cells to be infected by SARS-CoV2. The authors of the clinical study report that patients receiving an aprotinin aerosol could be discharged from hospital significantly earlier. SARS-CoV-2, the

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FDA approves axicabtagene ciloleucel CAR-T cells for second-line treatment of large B-cell lymphoma

On April 1, 2022, the Food and Drug Administration approved axicabtagene ciloleucel (Yescarta, Kite Pharma, Inc.) for adult patients with large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) that is refractory to first-line chemoimmunotherapy or relapses within 12 months of first-line chemoimmunotherapy. It is not indicated for the treatment of patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma. Approval was

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Natural Killer Cells Complexed With a Bispecific Antibody May Provide New Treatment Option for Patients With Advanced Lymphoma

Natural killer (NK) cells derived from cord blood that were activated and complexed with a CD30/CD16A bispecific antibody elicited an 89 percent overall response rate in patients with relapsed or refractory CD30+ lymphoma, according to results from a phase I/II clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2022, held April 8-13. “We were favorably surprised by the

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Inappropriate Antibiotics Prescriptions Associated With COVID-19 Outpatient Visits Among Medicare Beneficiaries, April 2020 to April 2021: study published on JAMA

Antibiotics are ineffective treatment for viral syndromes, including COVID-19. Was characterized antibiotic prescribing in older adults with outpatient COVID-19 visits to identify opportunities to improve prescribing practices. Were used 100% Medicare carrier claims and Part D event files to identify beneficiaries with a COVID-19 outpatient visit and associated antibiotic prescriptions. We included beneficiaries aged 65

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Study found substantial use of systemic corticosteroids for non-hospitalized patients with COVID-19, contrary to NIH treatment guidelines advising against such intervention in mild to moderate cases.

In June 2020, preliminary results for the Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) trial conducted in the UK indicated benefit from dexamethasone in severely ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19 but potential harm in those not requiring oxygen. In October 2020, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued COVID-19 treatment guidelines advising against systemic corticosteroid use

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Impact of high-risk cytogenetics on outcomes for children and young adults receiving CD19-directed CAR T-cell therapy

CD19 CAR T-cell therapy is effective at achieving durable remission for relapsed/refractory ALL across cytogenetic risk groups. CD19 CAR T-cell treatment results for patients with high-risk cytogenetics including Ph+, Ph-like, and KMT2A-rearranged ALL are encouraging. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy can induce durable remissions of relapsed/refractory B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, case reports suggested differential

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COVID-19: brain impact of SARS-CoV-2 on the nervous system

Emerging studies have increasingly recognized Covid-19 as an inflammatory disease. Brain shrinkage, brain-blood barrier disruptions and neurodegeneration seem to emerge as an inflammatory consequence of acute infection that for some progresses into Long Covid. Cognitive impairments are consistently reported as one of the most persistent and some of the more impairing symptoms of Long Covid.

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ALY101 molecule holds promise in potential therapies for cancer and rare diseases

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and the Italian Institute of Technology have developed a new molecule, ALY101, that shows promising anti-cancer activity against a wide range of tumor cell types and in mouse models of a common type of melanoma. The findings, “Structure-based Design of CDC42 Effector Interaction Inhibitors for the Treatment of

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Penn Medicine Study: Pulse Oximeters Did Not Change Outcomes for Patients in COVID-19 Monitoring Program

Already monitored for worsening symptoms via automated text messages, patients with pulse oximeters in the COVID Watch program had similar recovery to those without them. Using a pulse oximeter to measure oxygen levels is no better than just regularly asking patients with COVID-19 if they are short of breath, according to new research at the

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Covid-19 increases the risk of blood clots up to six months after infection

The risk of pulmonary embolism and venous thrombosis is multiplied by a corona infection. According to a new study of all those who tested positive in Sweden, this applies six months after the diagnosis. According to a study, people infected with SARS-CoV-2 have an increased risk of developing severe blood clots for up to six months after infection . According

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A Mount Sinai-led team developed a reproducible and scalable method to advance maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs)

A study reporting this new protocol was published in the April 7 print edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell. A Mount Sinai-led team has developed a reproducible and scalable method to advance maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs)—cells that support heart muscle contraction, generated in the lab from human stem cell lines—which researchers

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Valoctocogene Roxaparvovec Gene Therapy for Hemophilia A

BACKGROUND Valoctocogene roxaparvovec (AAV5-hFVIII-SQ) is an adeno-associated virus 5 (AAV5)–based gene-therapy vector containing a coagulation factor VIII complementary DNA driven by a liver-selective promoter. The efficacy and safety of the therapy were previously evaluated in men with severe hemophilia A in a phase 1–2 dose-escalation study. METHODS Was conducted an open-label, single-group, multicenter, phase 3

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CAR T cells expressing a pluripotent pro-inflammatory neutrophil-activating protein (NAP) from Helicobacter pylori to better fight cancer

Immunotherapy is increasingly becoming a successful way to treat cancer. Researchers at Uppsala University have now developed armed CAR-T cells that reinforce the immune defense against cancer and that could increase the possibilities to successfully treat solid tumors. The study has been published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering. The use of immunotherapy to treat cancer

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SARS-CoV-2 triggers massive inflammation: result of a study published by Children’s Hospital in Nature

A study led by researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital explains for the first time why COVID-19 causes severe inflammation in some people, leading to acute respiratory distress and multi-organ damage. Surprisingly, the study also finds that antibodies that people develop when they contract COVID-19 can sometimes lead to more inflammation, while antibodies generated by mRNA

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Johns Hopkins-Led Study Finds Convalescent Plasma Can Be Effective Early COVID-19 Therapy

Peer-reviewed publication in New England Journal of Medicine validates findings first announced in December The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) today published final results of a nationwide multicenter study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health that show plasma from patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and whose blood contains

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Specialized Liver Blood Vessel Identity Factor Required for Regeneration

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine have identified a key protein that induces the program to build specialized liver blood vessels. The discovery could lead to engineered replacement hepatic tissue to treat common liver diseases. There are many types of blood vessels in the human body that are functionally different from each other. In the liver,

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Johns Hopkins-Led Study Finds Convalescent Plasma Can Be Effective Early COVID-19 Therapy

Peer-reviewed publication in New England Journal of Medicine validates findings first announced in December The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM)  published final results of a nationwide multicenter study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health that show plasma from patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and whose blood

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For children aged under 5, the incidence rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection is higher with the omicron versus the delta variant

For children aged under 5, the incidence rate of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection was higher with the omicron variant versus the delta variant, according to a research letter published online April 1 in JAMA Pediatrics. Lindsey Wang, from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, and colleagues examined incidence

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SARS-CoV-2 innate defense system: the role of neutrophil and epithelial defensins

One of the most important layers of our body’s defense against SARS-CoV-2 lies in our innate immune system. The innate immune system protects our body from microbes, viruses, bacteria, and parasites that we have not previously encountered. While much of public attention and awareness of human immunity is focused on adaptive or learned immunity, innate

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In animal study, implant churns out CAR-T cells to combat cancer

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed an implantable biotechnology that produces and releases CAR-T cells for attacking cancerous tumors. In a proof-of-concept study involving lymphoma in mice, the researchers found that treatment with the implants was faster and more effective than conventional CAR-T cell

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Potent suppression of neuroendocrine tumors and gastrointestinal cancers by CDH17 CAR T cells without toxicity to normal tissues

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can be remarkably effective in treating leukemias and lymphomas, but there are no successful immunotherapies for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and gastrointestinal cancers (GICs) yet. Researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered that CAR-T cells directed to a tumor antigen, CDH17, a cell surface marker expressed on both NETs and GICs but also

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Anti-nausea drugs may increase the risk of stroke, according to a new study from Inserm.

Taking drugs to fight nausea and vomiting can increase the risk of ischemic stroke, according to a new study from Inserm. Increased risks from the first days of treatment. Anti Dopaminergic Antiemetics are associated with an increased risk of developing a stroke . It was researchers from Inserm and the University of Bordeaux who highlighted this link. The results have been

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Most anti-PF4 antibodies in Covid-19 vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia are transient

Platelet-activating anti-PF4 antibodies in VITT are transient in >90% of patients. Likely VITT patients can safely receive a second vaccination shot with an mRNA vaccine, independent of their VITT-antibody status. Vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) is triggered by vaccination against COVID-19 with adenovirus vector vaccines (ChAdOx1 nCoV-19; Ad26.COV2-S). In this observational study, were followed VITT patients

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“Deltacron” a combination of the delta (AY.4) and BA.1 omicron variants named by the WHO as the BA.1 x AY.4 recombinant.

A combination of the delta (AY.4) and BA.1 omicron variants has been named by the World Health Organization as the BA.1 x AY.4 recombinant. First detected in France in January 2022, it has since picked up the nickname “deltacron”1 How does a recombinant emerge? Recombinants can emerge when multiple variants infect the same person at

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American College of Cardiology Issues Clinical Guidance on CardioVascular Consequences of COVID-19

A new Expert Consensus Decision Pathway released by the ACC addresses the evaluation and management of some of the more common cardiovascular sequelae in adults with COVID-19. The Pathway, published March 16 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, specifically addresses myocarditis and other types of myocardial involvement, patient-centered approaches for long COVID, and

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Huge step forward towards gene therapy and diagnosis for genetic eye disease

New opportunities towards gene therapy and diagnosis for the blinding eye disease, retinal dystrophy, may now become available following work done by the Eye Genetics Research Unit at Children’s Medical Research Institute. This work was published in the Journal of Personalized Medicine today. The team looked at the RPGR gene which is involved in maintaining

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Kids with rare autoimmune disease antiphospholipid syndrome show these symptoms before blood clots 

Antiphospholipid syndrome is rare in adults and even less common among children.  Each year, around two of every 100,000 American adults receive a new diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome, or APS, an autoimmune disease known to cause inflammation and recurring, potentially fatal, blood clots. The number of children with APS is likely much smaller but unknown –

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Excess Neuropeptides Disrupt Lung Function in Infant Disease and COVID-19

UC San Diego study identifies lung neuroendocrine cells as drivers of developmental lung disease; similar mechanism may contribute to COVID-19 symptoms COVID-19 has put a spotlight on the pulmonary and nervous systems, but there is still much to learn about how they interact. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine recently explored

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Cardiac damage as a side effect of CAR-T cell cancer therapy

CAR-T-cell cancer therapy uses special T-cells that are specifically directed towards tumor antigens, the so-called (CAR)-T-cells. These cells trigger a targeted immune response that helps the body recognize and fight cancer cells. But, like other cancer therapies, the treatment can cause unwanted side effects, such as affecting heart function. Scientists from the Medical Faculty of the University

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Global death toll of COVID-19 pandemic may be more than three times higher than official records, estimates published on Lancet indicate

More than three times as many people may have died worldwide as a result of the pandemic than official COVID-19 death records suggest, according to an analysis published in The Lancet. While the official COVID-19 death toll was 5.9 million between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2021, the new study estimates 18.2 million excess deaths

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Cellular therapy improves signs and symptoms of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Clinical trial results promising for people with the debilitating disorder A clinical trial at UC Davis Health and six other sites showed that a cellular therapy offers promise for patients with late-stage Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare genetic disorder causing muscle loss and physical impairments in young people. The therapy appears to be safe and effective

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Finding a treatment for critically ill COVID-19 patients: alpha-1 antitryspin clinical trial

A clinical trial conducted by researchers from RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences and Beaumont Hospital Dublin has indicated an effective treatment for critically ill COVID-19 patients. The study, published today in Med, investigates the effects of using an anti-inflammatory protein, alpha-1 antitryspin (AAT), to treat COVID-19 patients who have progressed to acute respiratory distress

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Neuro Long-Covid explained

Two studies published this week have added to a growing body of evidence linking covid infection to subsequent cognitive impairment, even in cases of less severe disease. One study, a preprint published in Nature, examined 785 UK Biobank participants aged 51-81 who routinely receive brain scans and cognitive testing as part of the Biobank’s data gathering. About

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Coagulation proteases and Direct Oral Anticoagulants impact on cancer growth and metastasis

The hemostatic system in cancer The hemostatic system forms an integral part of the innate immune system and contributes to tumor growth and metastasis. Many malignancies are associated with a hyper-thrombotic state that derives foremost from tissue factor (TF), the initiator of the coagulation cascade, expressed by tumor cells and innate immune cells and stromal

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RECOVERY trial shows Baricitinib reduces deaths in patients hospitalised with COVID-19

The Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) trial has demonstrated that baricitinib, an anti-inflammatory treatment normally used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, reduces the risk of death when given to hospitalised patients with severe COVID-19. The benefit was in addition to those of dexamethasone and tocilizumab, two other anti-inflammatory treatments which have previously been shown to

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COVID-19 infections increase risk of heart conditions up to a year later

Cardiovascular care essential part of post-infection care An analysis of federal health data indicates that people who have had COVID-19 are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications within the first month to a year after infection, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs St. Louis

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CAR-based therapies an opportunity for immuno-medicine beyond cancer: a review published on Nature Metabolism

CAR T therapy has had enormous impact in some areas of oncology, and notable efforts are underway to extend the success to additional forms of cancer. However, the use of engineered T cells may be evenmore attractive for disorders other than cancer for several reasons. This review analyses different opportunities and future directions. First, for

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Connecting science to medicine: tendon-like tissue created from human stem cells

Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental (TMDU) develop artificial tendons in vitro from human stem cells that could fix common tendon injuries such as Achilles tendon rupture.  Tendons are tissues that connect muscles to bones and are important for movement and locomotion. Injuries to tendons are quite common, with millions of people – particularly athletes

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Gene Therapy for Thalassemia Ends Need for Transfusions in Young Children

Phase 3 clinical trial included children younger than 12 years Over 90 percent of patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia, an inherited blood disorder, no longer needed monthly blood transfusions years after receiving gene therapy, according to an international Phase 3 clinical trial that for the first time included children younger than 12 years of age. Twenty-two patients

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A new study shows MIS-C is rare among teens COVID-19 vaccinated

COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to trigger a rare inflammatory condition linked to coronavirus infection in children, according to an analysis of U.S. government data published Tuesday. The condition, formally known as multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, involves fever plus symptoms affecting at least two organs and often includes stomach pain, skin rash or bloodshot eyes. It’s

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Mesenchymal stem cell‑based treatments for COVID‑19: an updated review

This review describes the origins, pathogenesis, and clinical features of COVID-19 and the potential uses of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in therapeutic treatments for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients. MSCs have previously been shown to have positive effects in the treatment of lung diseases, such as acute lung injury, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis,

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Vertebral body tethering: Another option for treating scoliosis in children

Fusion surgery has been the long-standing treatment for people with scoliosis – a side-to-side curve of the spine. But other options have become available — including vertebral body tethering for children with scoliosis. “Vertebral tethering is a new tool in the tool kit for the treatment of scoliosis,” says A. Noelle Larson, M.D., a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at Mayo

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Foreseeing the future of European medicine

Experts say careful application of advanced tech could usher in a golden age of healthcare New technologies could enable medicine to progress in leaps and bounds, but only with the right regulatory and ethical frameworks. That was one of the messages from panelists discussing the future of medicine at the Science|Business conference Horizon Europe: The first assessment as

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Advances in CAR-T Cell Genetic Engineering Strategies to Overcome Hurdles in Solid Tumors Treatment: a review published on Frontiers

In this review, it’s provided an overview of the major mechanisms used by tumor cells to evade immune defenses and are critically exposed the most optimistic engineering strategies to make CAR-T cell therapy a solid option for solid tumors. CAR-T cell based cell therapy is a moving field, which showed impressive results in hematopoietic cancer

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Ivermectin and Hydroxychloroquine 2020 prescriptions for Covid-19 shown highest in GOP-Dominated Counties: a JAMA Research Letter shows.

New prescriptions of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) and ivermectin increased in 2020, driven particularly by rates in counties with the highest proportion of Republican votes in the 2020 US presidential election, according to a cross-sectional study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. “Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that US prescribing of hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin during the COVID-19 pandemic may have

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Randomized trial published on JAMA Internal Medicine confirms Ivermectin is ineffective against progression to Severe COVID

Ivermectin treatment given to high-risk patients with mild-to-moderate COVID-19 during the first week of illness did not prevent progression to severe disease, according to results from a randomized clinical trial. “The study findings do not support the use of ivermectin for patients with COVID-19,” researchers conclude in the paper published online today in JAMA Internal Medicine. The open-label

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Vitamins do not lessen chance of dying from COVID-19: review published by University of Toledo researchers.

A new review of COVID-19 hospitalization data by researchers at The University of Toledo has found that taking immune-boosting supplements such as vitamin C, vitamin D and zinc do not lessen your chance of dying from COVID- Early in the pandemic, healthcare providers tried a variety of micronutrients as potential therapies for the new illness. More recently,

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COVID-19 vaccination may protect against variants better than natural infection, Stanford University study finds

COVID-19 vaccines are better than infection at making antibodies to recognize new viral variants, according to a Stanford study. Antibodies generated by COVID-19 vaccines are more suited to recognizing viral variants than antibodies that arise from natural infection, according to a study by researchers at Stanford Medicine. A key finding of the study might explain why: Regions

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NIH researchers Pinpoint “Rogue Autoantibodies” Associated With Severe COVID-19 Blood Clotting

What After studying blood samples from 244 patients hospitalized for COVID-19, a group of researchers, including those who work at the National Institutes of Health, identified “rogue antibodies” that correlate with severe illness and may help explain mechanisms associated with severe blood clotting. The researchers found circulating antiphospholipid antibodies, which can be more common among people

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The effectiveness of vaccination against long COVID: a rapid evidence briefing by UK Health Security Agency

People who had been fully vaccinated against covid-19 were around half as likely to develop long covid symptoms as people who had received only one vaccine dose or were unvaccinated, the UK Health Security Agency has said. The agency conducted a rapid review of evidence, including 15 UK and international studies up to January 2022.

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Creating universal blood-type organs for transplant

A study published in Science Translational Medicine performed at the Latner Thoracic Surgery Research Laboratories and UHN’s Ajmera Transplant Centre has proved that it is possible to convert blood type safely in donor organs intended for transplantation. This finding is an important step towards creating universal type O organs, which would significantly improve fairness in organ allocation

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First gene therapy for Tay-Sachs disease successfully given to two children

Two babies have received the first-ever gene therapy for Tay-Sachs disease after over 14 years of development. Tay-Sachs is a severe neurological disease caused by a deficiency in an enzyme called HexA. This enzyme breaks down a fatlike substance that normally exists in very small, harmless amounts in the brain. Without HexA, however, this fatlike substance can accumulate

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Virome characterization of wild mammalian game animals, traded and consumed as exotic food in China, reveals a spectrum of emerging pathogens

This study has greatly expanded the understanding of the diversity of viruses carried by a variety of wild animals, and provided an important scientific basis for the early warning and prevention of human and livestock diseases.Vertebrate-associated viruses carried in wildlife The world’s top academic journal Cell published a research paper online: “Virome characterization of game

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U.S. peer-reviewed study on Omicron patient outcomes reveals significant differences in infection behavior

Within only three weeks after the Omicron variant was first identified among Houston Methodist patients, this variant rapidly took over and became the cause of a majority of new cases. By contrast, the delta variant took about three months to reach that same milestone after initial detection. Causing 98 percent of all new COVID-19 cases

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Using stem cells to regenerate the heart: identified key molecule for recognizing epicardial cells, the source of many cell types in a growing heart.

Heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the world. One reason is that unlike other tissues, such as bone and skin, the heart has remarkably poor regenerative capability after an injury such as a heart attack. Scientists have therefore searched for heart cells that have regenerative properties. A new study by the Yoshinori

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Long-term safety and efficacy of lentiviral hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell gene therapy for Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome

Genethon, a unique non-profit gene therapy R&D organization founded by the French Muscular Dystrophy Association (AFM-Telethon), announced today that its lentiviral based gene therapy, developed in collaboration with French and British teams, has demonstrated long-term efficacy in eight patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, a rare and severe immune deficiency. “These results confirm the stability and good

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COVID-19 infections increase risk of heart conditions up to a year later

Cardiovascular care essential part of post-infection care An in-depth analysis of federal health data indicates that people who have had COVID-19 are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications within the first month to a year after infection. Such complications include disruptive heart rhythms, inflammation of the heart, blood clots, stroke, coronary artery disease, heart

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Activity-dependent spinal cord neuromodulation rapidly restores trunk and leg motor functions after complete paralysis in three patients as published in Nature Medicine

A system developed by Grégoire Courtine and Jocelyne Bloch now enables patients with a complete spinal cord injury to stand, walk and even perform recreational activities like swimming, cycling andcanoeing. The images made headlines around the world in late 2018. David Mzee, who had been left paralyzed by a partial spinal cord injury suffered in

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Gene therapy in transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia

A novel gene therapy promoted transfusion independence in more than 90 percent of adult and pediatric patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia, according to a recent clinical trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The therapy represents a potentially curative treatment option for patients who must otherwise rely on life-long red blood cell transfusions. This approach provides

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Study of Penn Patients with Decade-Long Leukemia Remissions after CAR T Cell Therapy Reveals New Details About Persistence of Personalized “Living Drug” Cells

Two patients represent longest-known CAR T cell response to date, providing insight into treatment effects and outcomes In the summer of 2010, Bill Ludwig and Doug Olson were battling an insidious blood cancer called chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). They’d both received numerous treatments, and as remaining options became scarce, they volunteered to become the first

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FDA Takes Actions to Expand Use of Treatment for Outpatients with Mild-to-Moderate COVID-19

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration took two actions to expand the use of the antiviral drug Veklury (remdesivir) to certain non-hospitalized adults and pediatric patients for the treatment of mild-to-moderate COVID-19 disease. This provides another treatment option to reduce the risk of hospitalization in high-risk patients. Previously, the use of Veklury was limited to

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Landing therapeutic genes safely in the human genome

Researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute, Harvard Medical School, and the ETH Zurich predict and validate genomic safe harbors for therapeutic genes, enabling safer, more efficient, and predictable gene and cell therapies. Many future gene and cell therapies to treat diseases like cancer, rare genetic and other conditions could be enhanced in their efficacy, persistence, and

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Current vaccines teach T and B cells to fight Omicron: results published in two new papers

Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that four COVID-19 vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech, Moderna, J&J/Janssen, and Novavax) prompt the body to make effective, long-lasting T cells against SARS-CoV-2. These T cells can recognize SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern, including Delta and Omicron.  “The vast majority of T cell responses are still effective against Omicron,”

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Two new papers reveal through cryo-EM analysis the structural basis of antibody evasion and enhanced transmission of the Omicron variant

In a study recently published on Cell, researchers used cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) analysis to capture the open and closed states of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Omicron variant’s spike protein. The open and closed states of the Omicron spike appeared more compact compared to that of the SARS-CoV-2 G614 strain, which is likely due to

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Multiple Early Factors Anticipate Post-Acute COVID-19 Sequelae: a new paper published on Cell

A significant portion of people who contract the SARS-CoV-2 virus—some estimates suggest more than 40 percent—suffer chronic effects known as Post Acute Sequelae of COVID-19 (PASC), commonly referred to as long COVID. PASC symptoms include fatigue, brain fog, the loss of taste and smell, shortness of breath, and more. Now, researchers have identified several factors

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New gene therapy treatment resulted in sustained, clinically relevant benefits in children with Metachromatic Leucodystrophy: long term results published.

An investigational gene therapy showed benefit in pediatric patients with early-onset metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), a small study showed. Treatment with atidarsagene autotemcel (arsa-cel) preserved motor development and cognitive function in MLD patients enrolled in a prospective phase I/II trial or treated through expanded access programs, reported Alessandro Aiuti, MD, of the San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene

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50-64 age unvaccinated people were 44 more times to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than those who were fully vaccinated and had a booster shot, CDC shows

The risk of hospitalization for COVID-19 among older Americans is far higher for those who are unvaccinated than for those who are fully vaccinated and have had a booster shot, new government data shows. The differences were stark: In December, unvaccinated people 50 and older were 17 times more likely to be hospitalized with COVID-19 than those

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New EMA report on International regulators’ recommendations on COVID-19 vaccines and the Omicron variant

International regulators have published a report today highlighting their discussions on the effectiveness of current vaccines against the COVID-19 Omicron variant, regulatory requirements for a variant vaccine and considerations on clinical study design. The workshop on the global response to the COVID-19 Omicron variant was organised under the umbrella of the International Coalition of Medicines Regulatory Authorities (ICMRA) and

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Immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells in peripheral nerve injury: a review

Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) refers to varying degrees of trauma to peripheral nerve stems or branches. PNIaccounts for 1.5–4.0% of global trauma cases annually and is one of the most challenging health issues at present. Nerve regeneration is a complicated cellular process involving infammation, neurotrophic factors, neurotransmitters, adhesion, the formation of axons and growth cones,

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Placebo Effect Accounts for More Than Two-Thirds of COVID-19 Vaccine Adverse Events, Researchers Find

One-Third of Clinical Trial Participants Who Received No Vaccine Reported Systemic Adverse Advents Like Headache and Fatigue The placebo effect is the well-known phenomenon of a person’s physical or mental health improving after taking a treatment with no pharmacological therapeutic benefit – a sugar pill, or a syringe full of saline, for example. While the

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Epilepsy Research Boosts Case for New Gene Therapy

Research from the School of Medicine suggests how a newly developed gene therapy can treat Dravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy, and potentially prolong survival for people with the condition. The gene therapy, developed by Stoke Therapeutics, is now in clinical trials. Because most Dravet syndrome cases are caused by a mutation in the SCN1A gene, resulting in

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SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern and variants under investigation in England: technical briefing published by UK Health Security Agency

This report has been published to share the detailed variant surveillance analyses which contribute to the variant risk assessments and designation of new variants of concern (VOC) and variants under investigation (VUI). This specialist technical briefing contains early data and analysis on emerging variants and findings have a high level of uncertainty. SARS-CoV-2 Routine variant

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Association between vaccination status and reported incidence of post-acute long-COVID-19 symptoms in Israel: double dose Pfizer-BioNTech vaccination may have a protective effect.

An emerging and complex health problem that remains poorly characterized and understood is long coronavirus disease 2019 (Long COVID). The rapid outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Long COVID is a post-infection condition in which individuals do not recover completely for

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Viral dynamics and duration of PCR positivity of the SARSCoV-2 Omicron variant: a study of Harvard University researchers on NBA players

A significant proportion of people infected with the omicron variant of coronavirus were still contagious when they reach the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s recommended self-isolation exit date of five days, according to a  Harvard University study of a small number of cases from the National Basketball Association’s Covid-19 testing program. KEY FACTS Among omicron cases identified 

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COVID-19 nonhospitalized patients: therapeutic options review in Omicron era

Substantial progress has been made in therapeutics for nonhospitalized patients with COVID-19, but supply of and access to treatment remain limited. This Viewpoint summarizes currently available therapeutics for nonhospitalized patients in the setting of the Omicron variant including principles for equitable allocation. Patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 are those who have respiratory and systemic

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NIH researchers develop first stem cell model of albinism to study related eye conditions

A human induced pluripotent stem cell colony from OCA1A patient. The image was acquired using a confocal microscope and is stained for pluripotency marker proteins. The red color depicts transcription factor OCT4, green is SSEA4 protein and blue represents the nucleus of the cells.NEI “Animals used to study albinism are less than ideal because they

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CAR-T-cell therapy has the potential to replace chemoimmunotherapy for second-line treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL)

In the ZUMA-7 trial, at a median follow-up of 24.9 months, patients randomly assigned to receive CAR T-cell therapy with axicabtagene ciloleucel, or axi-cell (Yescarta) had a median event-free survival (EFS) of 8.3 months, compared with 2 months for patients randomly assigned to standard-of-care chemoimmunotherapy, reported Frederick L. Locke, MD, from the Moffitt Cancer Center

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Illinois College University researchers uncover new information about cellular death process, previously thought to be irreversible

A study published by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago describes a new method for analyzing pyroptosis — the process of cell death that is usually caused by infections and results in excess inflammation in the body — and shows that process, long thought to be irreversible once initiated, can in fact be halted

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A Japan National Institute of Infectious Diseases Control and Prevention Center study shows that Peak Infectiousness Of Omicron variant is 3-6 Days After Symptom Onset.

A new study conducted by Japanese researchers has shown that peak viral loads in people infected with omicron occur between 3 to 6 days after the onset of symptoms. The study raises further concerns about the CDC cutting the self-isolating time for people with Covid-19 to 5 days, not 10. The report was published online on January

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Naive T-cell depletion approach results in lower rates of chronic GVHD after transplant

Removing one type of T cell from donor blood used for stem cell grafts could greatly reduce a serious complication called graft-versus-host disease in patients with leukemia, according to a new study. Published today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the study reports that only 7% of leukemia patients who received stem cell transplants depleted of

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Single injection of messenger RNA Can Be Used to Make CAR T cells in vivo and to attack fibrosis in heart failure .

Penn study reveals an easier, more scalable way to make a powerful immunotherapy An experimental immunotherapy can temporarily reprogram patients’ immune cells to attack a specific target via only a single injection of messenger RNA (mRNA), similar to the mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine

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National Strategy for the new normal life with Covid-19: three papers published on JAMA

Today, a group of eminent physicians and scientists with global standing have acted decisively and in unison presenting the world with what it badly needs, whether it knows it or not: a comprehensive, cohesive plan which lays out the steps to reverse the course of Covid-19. Presented today as three linked “Viewpoints” in one of the world’s

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Predicting the future of COVID: Boston College biologists develop a computational model to detect emerging Coronavirus strains

Efforts to contain the spread of SARS-CoV-2 may benefit from a new analytical tool developed by a team led by biologists at Boston College, who report their computer simulation of molecular interactions can predict mutations of the virus and help develop insights into future variants of concern before they emerge. “We computationally predict what mutations

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A study of Infectious Economics in New York identifies discordant SARS-CoV-2 PCR and Rapid Antigen Test Results When Infectious

Anew study raises significant doubts about whether at-home rapid antigen tests can detect the Omicron variant before infected people can transmit the virus to others. The study looks at 30 people from settings including Broadway theaters and offices in New York and San Francisco where some workers were not only being tested daily but were, because

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Need for long-term monitoring of children born during the COVID-19 pandemic: a study shows differences in neurodevelopment at age 6 months.

A new paper published on JAMA Pediatrics by researchers of Columbia University Irving Medical Center analyses a ssociations between in utero exposure to maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection and neurodevelopment which are speculated, but currently unknown. To examine the associations between maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, being born during the COVID-19 pandemic regardless of maternal SARS-CoV-2 status,

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Study: COVID-19 Hospitalization Costs, Outcomes In 2020 Improved Over Time

The first comprehensive analysis of its kind examines hospital inpatient costs and length of stay. A new study published in Advances in Therapy provides the first comprehensive analysis of the hospitalization costs for COVID-19 patients, factors associated with costs and length of stay, and the monthly trends of costs and length of stay from April to December

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South-Africa Netcare sees ‘significantly fewer’ Omicron patients with existing illnesses at its hospitals

In South Africa, the pattern of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 early in the fourth wave showed fewer hospitalizations and reduced severity of illness compared with earlier waves, according to a research letter published online Dec. 30 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Caroline Maslo, M.D., Ph.D., from Netcare Ltd. South Africa in Johannesburg, and

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COVID-19 patients have severely increased levels of oxidative stress and oxidant damage, and glutathione deficiency

Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have investigated the effect of infection with COVID-19 on the levels of oxidative stress, oxidant damage and glutathione, the most abundant physiological antioxidant. Compared to healthy age-matched individuals whose samples were taken before the pandemic started in 2019, patients hospitalized with COVID-19 had significantly increased levels of oxidative stress and

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Lymphoma Cell Metabolism May Provide New Cancer Target

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Photograph by CoRus13, distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license Aggressive and relatively common lymphomas called diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) have a critical metabolic vulnerability that can be exploited to trick these cancers into starving themselves, according to a study from researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and Cornell’s Ithaca campus.

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Emergence in Southern France of a new SARS-CoV-2 variant named B.1.640.2 of probably Cameroonian origin harbouring both substitutions N501Y and E484K in the spike protein and present in 67 hospitalised patients

A new coronavirus variant has been discovered in southern France, spreading in a small outbreak, according to a new study.The variant, tentatively identified B.1.640.2 according to a recent study backed by the French government that has yet to be peer-reviewed, is believed to be Cameroonian in origin and have so far spread to 67 patients in southern France.

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A potential at-home COVID-19 test is just as good as laboratory PCR tests, according to preclinical data

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have designed a high-quality assay that can be used in at-home tests for rapid COVID-19 screening. Results from an early preclinical study suggest that tests with the new assay may be just as reliable as the laboratory-based molecular tests — called PCR tests — used by hospitals for clinical diagnostics.  “Having fast and

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Sloan Kettering Institute Scientists Retool CAR T Cells to Serve as ‘Micropharmacies’ for Cancer Drugs

Immunotherapies called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells use genetically engineered versions of a patient’s own immune cells to fight cancer. These treatments have energized cancer care, especially for people with certain types of blood cancers. Now, scientists at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI) have developed new CAR T cells that can do something their

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Complement activation induces excessive T cell cytotoxicity in severe COVID-19, associated with fatal outcome.

A new paper published in Cell by Charitè group opens new perspectives to complement role in Covid-19 Highlights •Severe COVID-19 is marked by activated, highly cytotoxic CD16+ T cells •Immune complex-mediated degranulation of CD16+ T cells causes endothelial cell injury •C3a-rich environment in severe COVID-19 promotes differentiation of CD16+ T cells •Activated CD16+ T cells and complement proteins are

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Analysis of COVID-19 Vaccine Type and Adverse Effects Following Covid-19 Vaccination

This article was originally published here JAMA Netw Open. 2021 Dec 1;4(12):e2140364. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.40364. ABSTRACT IMPORTANCE: Little is known about the factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine adverse effects in a real-world population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate factors potentially associated with participant-reported adverse effects after COVID-19 vaccination. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The COVID-19 Citizen Science Study, an online

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Targeting the fibrin-neutrophil interaction prevented bone loss from periodontal disease

Human and animal study offers insight into treating periodontal disease and other inflammatory disorders. Blocking function of a blood-clotting protein prevented bone loss from periodontal (gum) disease in mice, according to research led by scientists at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health. Drawing on animal

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When and how to use the existing tests to detect SARS-CoV-2 virus

“Test, test, test.” This is how Tedros Adhanom , director general of the World Health Organization (WHO), urged the countries  at the beginning of the covid-19 pandemic. Testing, isolation and contact tracing should be – and have been in many cases – the “backbone of the global response” to the crisis, according to the head of the agency. According to experts,

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The Omicron variant is highly resistant against antibody-mediated neutralization: a new study on Cell shows

The rapid spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant suggests that the virus might become globally dominant. Further, the high number of mutations in the viral spike-protein raised concerns that the virus might evade antibodies induced by infection or vaccination. In thi paper on Cell are reported that the Omicron spike was resistant against most therapeutic

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A NIH researchers study shows SARS-CoV-2 can persist in the body as long as 230 days

In what they describe as the most comprehensive analysis to date of the SARS-CoV-2 virus’s distribution and persistence in the body and brain, scientists at the U.S. National Institutes of Health said they found the pathogen is capable of replicating in human cells well beyond the respiratory tract. The results, released online Saturday in a

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Discovery Health, South Africa’s largest private health insurance administrator, releases at-scale, real-world analysis of Omicron outbreak based on 211 000 COVID-19 test results in South Africa.

Summary: Vaccine effectiveness: o The two-dose Pfizer-BioNTech vaccination provides 70% protection against severe complications of COVID-19 requiring hospitalisation, and 33% protection against COVID-19 infection, during the current Omicron wave. Reinfection risk: For individuals who have had COVID-19 previously, the risk of reinfection with Omicron is significantly higher, relative to prior variants. Severity: The risk of hospital admission

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CAR-HEMATOTOX score: a model for CAR T-cell–related hematologic toxicity in relapsed/refractory large B-cell lymphoma

Immunotherapy with so-called CAR-T cells has established itself for the treatment of various leukemias (blood cancer) and lymphomas (lymph gland cancer). A team led by Dr. Kai Rejeski and Prof. Marion Subklewe from the Medical Clinic III of the LMU Klinikum found that many patients suffer from a side effect that initially fell under the radar: a

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HKUMed researchers find Omicron SARS-CoV-2 can infect faster and better than Delta in human bronchus but with less severe infection in lung

A study led by researchers from the LKS Faculty of Medicine at The University of Hong Kong (HKUMed) provides the first information on how the novel Variant of Concern (VOC) of SARS-CoV-2, the Omicron SARS-CoV-2 infect human respiratory tract. The researchers found that Omicron SARS-CoV-2 infects and multiplies 70 times faster than the Delta variant

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Universal Coronavirus Vaccines: an Urgent Need. Global coronaviral approach requested by Fauci and NIH researchers

A growing body of scientific evidence, considered together with ecological reality, strongly suggest that novel coronaviruses will continue to infect bats and other animal reservoirs and potentially emerge to pose a pandemic threat to humans. To counter future coronavirus outbreaks, the global scientific and medical research community should focus a major effort now on three

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Blockade or deletion of IFN-gamma reduces macrophage activation without compromising CAR T function in hematologic malignancies

Blood Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, has published a research article demonstrating a novel approach that may reduce a serious adverse effect associated with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, a form of immunotherapy. This research was presented at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in Atlanta, Georgia

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Fostering experimental and computational synergy to modulate hyperinflammation in severe Covid-19

An international collaboration between researchers from the Center for Cooperative Research in Biosciences (CIC bioGUNE, Bilbao), the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourgand and the Department of Immunology of St Jude Children’s Research Hospital (Kanneganti Lab, Memphis) highlights how fostering synergies between computational and experimental studies can lead to important

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Dual-vector gene therapy restores cochlear amplification and auditory sensitivity in a mouse model of DFNB16 hearing loss

Scientists at Boston Children’s Hospital have successfully used gene therapy to reverse a form of genetic hearing loss in mice. The team corrected a gene mutation that affects sensory hair cells in the inner ear, and the new jigsaw-like method could help improve gene therapy for other disorders. The target of the new treatment was

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Risks of myocarditis, pericarditis, and cardiac arrhythmias are more likely associated with Covid-19 infection than with vaccination

Led by the University of Oxford, a team of UK-based researchers have today reported results of the largest ever study to compare the risks of cardiovascular events, such as myocarditis, pericarditis, and cardiac arrhythmia, between different vaccines and COVID-19 infection, and the first to investigate the association between cardiac events and the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. While

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NIH National Eye Institute researchers identify potential AMD drugs with stem-cell based research tool

Model replicates features of complex disease and provides platform for screening existing drugs Using a stem-cell-derived model, researchers have identified two drug candidates that may slow dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness for which no treatment exists. The scientists, from the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of

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FDA issued an EUA for New Long-Acting Monoclonal Antibodies for Pre-exposure Prevention of COVID-19 in patients with moderate to severely compromised immune systems or a history of severe adverse reactions to a COVID-19 vaccine

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization (EUA) for AstraZeneca’s Evusheld (tixagevimab co-packaged with cilgavimab and administered together) for the pre-exposure prophylaxis (prevention) of COVID-19 in certain adults and pediatric individuals (12 years of age and older weighing at least 40 kilograms [about 88 pounds]).  The product is only authorized

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A new brief of Health System Tracker examines how deaths from COVID-19 rank among other leading causes of death in the U.S. and vaccine saving of 163.000 deaths since June 2021.

This brief examines how deaths from COVID-19 rank among other leading causes of death in the U.S. We find that COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in November 2021. We also find that in October, COVID-19 was the number 1 cause of death for people age 45-54 and in the top 7 leading

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Potentially Serious Side Effect Seen in Patient after CAR-T cell treatment for multiple myeloma

Mount Sinai scientists have become the first to report a potentially serious side effect related to a new form of immunotherapy known as CAR-T cell therapy, which was recently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Their findings were published as a case study in Nature Medicine in December. Multiple myeloma is a complex and incurable type

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Israel study shows that booster receivers at least 5 months after a second dose of BNT162b2 had 90% lower mortality due to Covid-19.

Booster doses of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine set recipients up to effectively withstand the ravages of both the Delta and Omicron variants, a group of new studies suggest. Boosted folks are 90% less likely to die from a Delta infection than people relying solely on the initial two-dose vaccination, Israeli data show. That protection will be critically important

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New Technology published by Caltech researchers is One Step Closer to Targeted Gene Therapy

Broad and robust transgene expression across brain regions of marmoset is shown after systemic delivery with engineered capsid. Gene therapy is a powerful developing technology that has the potential to address myriad diseases. For example, Huntington’s disease, a neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by a mutation in a single gene, and if researchers could go into

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Scientists have discovered that gene therapy and the diabetes drug metformin may be potential treatments for late-onset retinal degeneration (L-ORD), a rare, blinding eye disease.

Clinical trial planning underway to test the widely used diabetes drug metformin as a preventive treatment for the blinding eye disease Scientists have discovered that gene therapy and the diabetes drug metformin may be potential treatments for late-onset retinal degeneration (L-ORD), a rare, blinding eye disease. Researchers from the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of

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3 Teens with COVID-19 Developed Sudden Severe Psychiatric Symptoms. Why?

UCSF-Led Study Shows Unruly Immune System May Trigger ‘Turncoat’ Antibodies Suicidal thoughts, “paranoia-like fears,” delusions and “foggy brain” have been identified in three adolescents who had mild or asymptomatic COVID-19. Now, a new study into their immune responses identifies a potential mechanism by which these symptoms emerged. The study, led by researchers at the UCSF Weill

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Early Features on South Africa Tshwane District Omicron Variant Patient Profile: absence of any significant increase in in-hospitals deaths in relation to the dramatic rise in the case rate.

There has been a significant rise in new SARS-CoV-2 infections in the Gauteng Province in the last four weeks which has been attributed to the new Omicron variant announced on 24 November 2021. The first cases of Omicron were detected in the Tshwane District and coincided with the sharp rise in new infections, heralding the

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The first six months of COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Italy averted 29350 deaths and 4256332 new infections: results published in a paper of Greenwich, Boston and Indiana Universities

In a paper published in MedRxiv are analyzed the effectiveness of the first six months of vaccination campaign against SARS-CoV-2 in Italy by using a computational epidemic model which takes into account demographic, mobility, vaccines, as well as estimates of the introduction and spreading of the more transmissible Alpha variant. Are considered six sub-national regions

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Researchers reveal possible role for anti-idiotype antibodies in long-term effects of COVID-19 and some vaccines complications

With around 256 million cases and more than 5 million deaths worldwide, the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged scientists and those in the medical field. Researchers are working to find effective vaccines and therapies, as well as understand the long-term effects of the infection. While the vaccines have been critical in pandemic control, researchers are still

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High-titre convalescent plasma therapy not effective against severe COVID-19 pneumonia: results of Italian TSUNAMI randomized clinical trial

1. Amongst patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, there was no difference in 30-day all-cause mortality, ventilation or cure in patients receiving convalescent plasma (CP) plus standard therapy versus standard therapy alone. 2. CP treatment was associated with more adverse events, including 5 instances of respiratory failure requiring treatment interruption. Patients who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2

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New study of Karolinska Institute and Helsinki University shows how digital and molecular data can be integrated to prevent ill health

With the development of sensors, apps and other digital alternatives for health monitoring, the individual’s opportunities to work proactively for better health and well-being increase. At the same time, the measurement of many different biomolecular variables (so-called multiomics) enables a deep and comprehensive profiling of human biology. – Instead of focusing on the treatment of the

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A detailed study by Max Planck Institute shows the maximum risks of being infected by SARS-CoV-2 for different scenarios with and without masks

Three metres are not enough to ensure protection. Even at that distance, it takes less than five minutes for an unvaccinated person standing in the breath of a person with Covid-19 to become infected with almost 100 percent certainty. That’s the bad news. The good news is that if both are wearing well-fitting medical or,

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Scientists of Arizona State University discover potential mechanism behind rare blood clots linked to adenovirus COVID-19 vaccines (VITT)

A cloud of platelet factor 4 proteins interacts with the electrostatic surface of the Oxford vaccine, as seen through the computational microscope.  An international team of scientists believe they may have found a molecular mechanism behind the extremely rare blood clots linked to adenovirus COVID-19 vaccines. “The mechanism which results in this condition, termed vaccine-induced

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Safety and immunogenicity of booster COVID-19 vaccine following two previous doses of AstraZeneca or Pfizer-BioNTech in the UK

Six different COVID-19 boosters are safe and provoke strong immune responses in people who have previously received a two-dose course of ChAdOx1-nCov19 (Oxford–AstraZeneca [ChAd]) or BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech [BNT]), according to the first randomised trial of boosters given after two doses of either vaccine, published in The Lancet. ChAd has now been deployed in more than 180

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Omicron SARS-CoV-2 variant: a new chapter in the COVID-19 pandemic. A comment on The Lancet by researchers of Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa

A new comment on Omicron SARS-CoV-2 variant has been published on The Lancet by South African researchers of Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in Durban South Africa. The Authors highlight that the first sequenced omicron case was reported from Botswana on Nov 11, 2021, and a few days lateranother sequenced case was reported

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Robotic high-throughput biomanufacturing and functional differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells using the CompacT SelecT (CTST) platform

The CompacT SelecT (CTST) platform is a modular robotic system that integrates a full range of cell culture proceduresunder sterile conditions that mimic the manual cell culture process. These procedures include automated handling of different cell culture vessels, pipetting large and small volumes at adjustable speeds, cell counting, cell viability analysis, cell density assessment, microscopic

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Increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 reinfection associated with emergence of the Omicron variant in South Africa 2021-12-01: new paper published in medRxiv

Objective of the paper is to examine whether SARS-CoV-2 reinfection risk has changed through time in South Africa, in the context of the emergence of the Beta, Delta, and Omicron variants A retrospective analysis of routine epidemiological surveillance data Setting Line list data on SARS-CoV-2 with specimen receipt dates between 04 March 2020 and 27

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A new CRB Life Sciences Report Highlights rapid advances in the development of cell and gene therapies

Rapid advances in the development of cell and gene therapies over the past several years have heralded “an evolutionary time in medicine.” That’s the opinion of Peter Walters, Director of Advanced Therapies at CRB. That thought reflects data seen in CRB’s annual Horizon Life Sciences report that highlights the rapid expansion of the development of cell and

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Multiyear Factor VIII Expression after AAV Gene Transfer for Hemophilia A in 16 out of 18 volunteers

About 20,000 people in the U.S. live with hemophilia A. It’s a rare X-linked genetic disorder that affects predominantly males and causes their blood to clot poorly when healing wounds. For some, routine daily activities can turn into painful medical emergencies to stop internal bleeding, all because of changes in a single gene that disables

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No increased risk of Myocardial Infarction, Stroke and Pulmonary Embolism After BNT162b2 mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine in People Aged 75 Years or Older: French study published in JAMA

A French population-based study provides further evidence that the BNT162b2 Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA COVID-19 vaccine does not increase the short-term risk for serious cardiovascular adverse events in older people. The study showed no increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or pulmonary embolism (PE) following vaccination in adults aged 75 years or older in the 14 days following vaccination. “These

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Moderna Announces Strategy to Address Omicron (B.1.1.529) SARS-CoV-2 Variant

Company testing three existing COVID-19 vaccine booster candidates against the Omicron variant Company announcing a new variant-specific vaccine candidate against Omicron (mRNA-1273.529) Moderna, a biotechnology company pioneering messenger RNA (mRNA) therapeutics and vaccines, today announced updates to its strategy to address SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, given the emergence of the B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant. The recently described Omicron

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A systematic review on Blockchain applications in health care for COVID-19 and beyond published on The Lancet Digital Health

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial and global impact on health care and has greatly accelerated the adoption of digital technology. One of these emerging digital technologies, blockchain, has unique characteristics (eg, immutability, decentralisation, and transparency) that can be useful in multiple domains (eg, management of electronic medical records and access rights, and mobile

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Scientific analysis of COVID death data incorrectly manipulated to demonstrate vaccines are ineffective or worse: that’s not the reality

Social media posts commenting on data from the UK, Israel and South Africa, among others, claim deaths from COVID (or all deaths) are now higher in vaccinated than unvaccinated citizens. Others make the more moderate claim vaccines do nothing to prevent death from COVID. These reports appear intimidating, because they usually utilise real data or statistics. Many of the raw numbers presented are

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Nearly half a million lives saved by COVID-19 vaccination only among people over 60 in less than a year in Europe following a WHO/ECDC study

A new study by the WHO Regional Office for Europe and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) published in Eurosurveillance estimates that 470,000 lives have been saved among those aged 60 years and over since the start of COVID-19 vaccination roll-out in 33 countries across the WHO European Region. This estimate does not

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A small cluster of SARS_CoV-2 B.1.1.529 new variant with 32 spike protein mutations identified in Botswana and in Gauteng Province in South Africa

A new variant of COVID-19 identified in Botswana and Nigeria with dozens of mutations is being watched closely, amid fears it could be resistant to the effect of currently-used vaccines. The B.1.1.529 variant has more mutations affecting the spike protein targeted by vaccines than any other strain identified to date, although it’s not yet clear

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Review on Covid-19 Vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia published in The Lancet Haematology

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 were developed, tested, and introduced at a remarkable speed. Although the vaccine introduction had a major impact on the evolution of COVID-19, some potential rare side-effects of the vaccines were observed. Within a short period, three scientific groups from Norway, Germany, and the UK reported cerebral

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Harms Linked to Unapproved Stem Cell Interventions Highlight Need for Greater FDA Enforcement

Unproven regenerative medical products have led to infections, disabilities, and deaths Stem cell products and other regenerative therapies have significant potential to treat traumatic injuries and serious diseases. Although some have earned approval from the Food and Drug Administration, most have not, and many of these unapproved interventions have led to life-threatening infections, chronic pain,

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UCalgary study shows how desamethasone, used to treat critically ill COVID-19 patients, modulates immature neutrophils and interferon programming and why drug may only benefit males

Research into the way our immune systems respond to COVID-19 reveals the sex of a patient may affect how well drugs work Anew study from the University of Calgary shows how dexamethasone, the main treatment for severe COVID-19 lung infections, alters how immune cells work, which may help male patients, but has little to no benefit for

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New analysis predicts how well vaccines will work against COVID-19 strains

Vaccines are less effective against some COVID-19 variants and boosting may be required within one year to maintain efficacy above 50 per cent, according to a new study. The researchers from the Sydney Institute for Infectious Diseases at the University of Sydney, UNSW Sydney’s Kirby Institute and the University of Melbourne’s Doherty Institute have conducted an analysis

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Early Convalescent Plasma for High-Risk Outpatients with Covid-19: results of a new trial published in NEJM confirm failure

The object of the study was to verify if early administration of convalescent plasma obtained from blood donors who have recovered from coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) could prevent disease progression in acutely ill, high-risk patients with Covid-19. In this randomized, multicenter, single-blind trial, we assigned patients who were being treated in an emergency department for

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Gene therapy effective in children with severe Hurler’s syndrome: the treatment, developed by SR-Tiget in Milan published in NEJM

The first tests on eight children show favorable preliminary results, with an adjustment of motor and cognitive skills and improvements in some brain and joint parameters Gene therapy takes steps forward in the fight against rare diseases. Eight children with severe Hurler’s syndrome, a disease associated with reduced life expectancy, benefited from this therapy. The

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First Data show Pfizer PF-07321332 Protease Inhibitor pill is effective in Preventing Severe COVID-19

Over the course of this pandemic, significant progress has been made in treating COVID-19 and helping to save lives. That progress includes the development of life-preserving monoclonal antibody infusions and repurposing existing drugs, to which NIH’s Accelerating COVID-19 Therapeutic Interventions and Vaccines (ACTIV) public-private partnership has made a major contribution. But for many months we’ve had hopes that a

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Incidence and risk factors associated with bleeding and thrombosis following chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy

Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR T) therapy has revolutionized the field of malignant hematology. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapy has resulted in effective, often durable, responses for chemotherapy-refractory B-cell lymphoma and B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) in prospective clinical trials. CAR T cells against B-cell maturation antigen have also shown overall response rates in the range of

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Monash University study uncovers a new understanding of how mesenchymal stromal cells benefit patients in cell therapy

The therapeutic benefit to patients receiving mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy is not because the injected cells remain viable, but because of cell death, researchers at the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) have found. In recent years, significant efforts have been made to develop stem cell-based therapies for difficult-to-treat diseases. MSC therapy is regenerative cell-based

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Low-molecular-weight heparin use in Covid-19 is associated with curtailed viral persistence: a retrospective multicentre observational study

Clotting problems and resulting complications are common in COVID-19 patients. Researchers at the Medical University of Vienna have now shown that a member of the anticoagulant group of drugs not only has a beneficial effect on survival of COVID-19 patients, but also influences the duration of active infection with the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. The results were

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New research by Boston Children’s Hospital on ricolinostat repurposing to curb neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and to fight severe inflammation in Covid-19

As we’ve seen during the COVID-19 pandemic, serious infections sometimes trigger an excessive inflammatory reaction that does as much harm — or more — than the infection itself. New research at Boston Children’s Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital suggests a potential way to block this hyperinflammation response by repurposing or modifying an existing drug.

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Direct Comparison of Antibody Responses to Pfizer, Astrazeneca, Sputnik V and Sinopharm SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines in Mongolia: study published in Cell Host & Microbe by Stanford University

Different SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are approved in various countries, but few direct comparisons of the antibody responses they stimulate have been reported. In thi paper the authors collected plasma specimens in July 2021 from 196 Mongolian participants fully vaccinated with one of four COVID-19 vaccines: Pfizer/BioNTech, AstraZeneca, Sputnik V and Sinopharm. Functional antibody testing with a

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Study reveals tactics used by US stem cell clinics to market their treatments

Stem cell clinics continue to thrive in the US and worldwide, building their business on misleading advertising and offering unapproved and unproven stem-cell-based interventions (SCBI). A research recently published in Stem Cell Reports by Emma Frow, David Brafman, and colleagues from Arizona State University, asked what kinds of claims and evidence these clinics use to market their

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Covid-19 vaccines protection against hospitalization and ICU effectiveness dropping over time: results in different studies

As millions of eligible people consider getting a booster shot, many are wondering what the data tells us about the effectiveness of the vaccines, and how much their protection might be waning. The good news is that a growing body of research shows that the vaccines authorized remain highly protective against severe disease and hospitalization

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SARS-CoV-2 uses sugars to invade human cells, new study by University of Alberta shows

Understanding the process could help scientists look out for new, more infectious variants. Sugars found on the surface of human cells influence COVID-19 infection, according to a University of Alberta-led study that is one of the first to observe this relationship and suggests that cells in the brain might be particularly susceptible. “The idea here is that

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Novel mesenchymal stem cell therapy approach proves effective in treating COVID-19

An international team of researchers has advanced a new therapeutic approach using stem cells to treat COVID-19. Despite many advances in treating the COVID-19 virus there remains no specific cure for patients with infection. This is especially the case with hospitalised patients who end up in the ICU requiring mechanical ventilation support. Key members of

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Cell therapies, Gene therapy and CAR-T cells highlighted in EFPIA Pipeline Review 2021 Update

The new EFPIA Pipeline Review reveals that infectious, inflammatory, cancer, Alzheimer’s and rare disesases areas are among the top priorities of researchers running clinical trials today to investigate new medicines and vaccines. The comprehensive report found that in 2020 alone, around 5,000 clinical trials were launched – despite the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, the volume of trials has

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BNT162b2 Covid-19 Vaccine in Children 5 to 11 Years of Age evaluation paper published in NEJM

Safe, effective vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) are urgently needed in children younger than 12 years of age. A phase 1, dose-finding study and an ongoing phase 2–3 randomized trial are being conducted to investigate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of two doses of the BNT162b2 vaccine administered 21 days apart in children 6

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Ernst & Young white paper details how the Cell Gene Therapy industry can collaborate to advance the field

Harnessing the power of cell and gene therapies will require a next-generation level of collaboration not seen before the COVID-19 pandemic. In brief Before cell and gene therapies can meet increasing demand at the necessary speed and scale, the industry must address key challenges. A fractured supply chain, complicated manufacturing and unprecedented pricing are among

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Pfizer’s novel COVID-19 oral antiviral protease inhibitor reduced risk of hospitalization or death by 89% in interm analysis of Phase 2/3 EPIC-HR study

PAXLOVID™ (PF-07321332; ritonavir) was found to reduce the risk of hospitalization or death by 89% compared to placebo in non-hospitalized high-risk adults with COVID-19 In the overall study population through Day 28, no deaths were reported in patients who received PAXLOVID™ as compared to 10 deaths in patients who received placebo Pfizer plans to submit the data as

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The cost-effectiveness of gene therapy for severe hemophilia B: a microsimulation study published in Blood

In the last issue of Blood, Boulos et al analyze the cost-effectiveness of factor IX gene therapy in patients with severe hemophilia B, in a microsimulation Markov model. Hemophilia is an X-linked disease that affects 400000 people worldwide, of whom 15% have hemophilia B caused by deficiency of factor IX (FIX), which affected the offspring of Queen Victoria,

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Oxford University researchers uncover gene that doubles risk of death from COVID-19

Scientists at Oxford University have identified the gene responsible for doubling the risk of respiratory failure from COVID-19. Sixty percent of people with South Asian ancestry carry the high-risk genetic signal, partly explaining the excess deaths seen in some UK communities, and the impact of COVID-19 in the Indian subcontinent. Previous work has already identified

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SP-101, an investigational inhaled gene therapy for cystic fibrosis, shows potential in animal study

Treatment with SP-101, an investigational gene therapy that Spirovant Sciences is developing for people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who are unable to benefit from current treatments, effectively increased CFTR gene activity in a ferret model of the disease, the company reported. Katherine Excoffon, PhD, Spirovant’s vice president of research, presented the data at the 2021 North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference (NACFC). Her

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Breakthrough Infection Study Compares Decline in Covid-19 Vaccine Effectiveness and Consequences for Mortality

A new study in the leading journal Science reviewed COVID-19 breakthrough infections among 780,225 Veterans, finding that vaccine protection declined from 87.9% to 48.1% during the 2021 Delta surge in the U.S. The researchers from PHI, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Texas Health Science Center found a dramatic decline in effectiveness

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The American stem cell sell in 2021: U.S. businesses selling unlicensed and unproven stem cell interventions. Ethical issues and misinformation linked to overhyped science.

In March 2021, 1,480 U.S. businesses operating 2,754 clinics were found selling purported stem cell treatments for various indications. More than four times as many businesses than were identified 5 years ago are selling stem cell products that are not FDA-approved and lack convincing evidence of safety and efficacy following a new paper published in Cell

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Children Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Develop a New Class of CAR-T Cells that Target Previously Untargetable Cancer Drivers

In a breakthrough for the treatment of aggressive solid cancers, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a novel cancer therapy that targets proteins inside cancer cells that are essential for tumor growth and survival but have been historically impossible to reach. Using the power of large data sets and advanced computational approaches,

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A review on Mesenchymal stem cells-derived exosomes for drug delivery

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-functional stem cells that are present in multiple human tissues and can be found in the spinal cord, umbilical cord blood, umbilical cord tissue, placenta tissue, adipose tissue, etc.. With low immunogenicity, multi-directional diferentiation ability, in particular homing ability, MSCs have signifcant research potential in cardiovascular diseases, nervous diseases, and

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Stem cell treatment failed to reduce inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis

Treatment with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has failed to significantly reduce inflammation in the brain of adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) in a phase 2 clinical trial. The into-the-vein treatment also failed to improve other clinical aspects of the condition. The results were shared in a study titled “Safety, tolerability, and activity of mesenchymal stem cells versus placebo

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Serine protease inhibitor Nafamostat may be beneficial in the treatment of high-risk COVID-19 patients requiring oxygen treatment: results of a randomised Phase II clinical trial published in EClinical Medicine.

Nafamostat, a serine protease inhibitor, has been used for the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation and pancreatitis. In vitro studies and clinical reports suggest its beneficial effect in the treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia. This phase 2 open-label, randomised, multicentre, controlled trial evaluated nafamostat (4.8 mg/kg/day) plus standard-of-care (SOC) in hospitalised patients with COVID-19 pneumonia (i.e.,

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Long-term persistence of SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibody responses after Covid-19 infection: levels conferring 50% protection are maintained for around 990 days post-symptom onset.

In a paper published on The lancet researchers of University of Hong Kong used 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) antibody titre data from 115 sera collected longitudinally from 90 to 386 days after onset of symptoms or first RT-PCR confirmation from 62 RT–PCR confirmed SARS-CoV infected individuals, to estimate that PRNT antibody will remain

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Lifelong calcium and 25-hydroxyvitamin D use may shorten life expectancy and increase the risk of cardiovascular disease: a Karolinska Institute study shows.

Supplementation with calcium and vitamin D, alone or together, leads to increases in serum calcium (S-Ca) concentration with a peak 4 h after each ingestion and a more long-lasting elevation in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (S-25(OH)D), the marker metabolite for vitamin D status. Whether regular calcium supplementation elevates S-Ca after several months of use is debatable

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Gene Therapies against Rare diseases Boosted by NIH, FDA and Industry Alliance

The National Institutes of Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10 pharmaceutical companies and five non-profit organizations have partnered to accelerate development of gene therapies for the 30 million Americans who suffer from a rare disease. While there are approximately 7,000 rare diseases, only two heritable diseases currently have FDA-approved gene therapies. The newly launched Bespoke

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Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise as Angelman Syndrome Treatment

The new therapy was generally well-tolerated and prevented key signs of the condition in animal models. Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have reported in the journal JCI Insight encouraging early tests of a gene therapy strategy against Angelman syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder that features poor muscle control and balance, hard-to-treat epilepsy, and intellectual disabilities. Angelman

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Alberta University researchers team uncovers new proteases inhibitors to slow SARS-CoV-2 replication mechanism

Novel protease inhibitors show promise for developing safer, more effective COVID-19 treatments. A team of researchers at the University of Alberta has uncovered new antiviral agents that could lead to safer and more effective COVID-19 treatments than other current drugs under development. In a recently published paper in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the researchers identified novel protease

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Patients with severe COVID-19 could benefit from higher doses of corticosteroids

A large international study in hospitalised patients with severe COVID-19 has shown that while a higher dose of steroids did not significantly reduce mortality, there was a trend towards benefit without increased side effects. Published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study compared the standard 6mg dose of the steroid dexamethasone

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Previously SARS-CoV-2 infected, if unvaccinated: reinfection by SARS-CoV-2 is likely, study finds

Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been much uncertainty about how long immunity lasts after an unvaccinated person is infected with SARS-CoV-2. Now a team of scientists led by faculty at Yale School of Public Health and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte have an answer: Strong protection following natural infection is short-lived. “Reinfection

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COVID-19 Vaccines guarantee protection to non immune family members too

Risk of COVID-19 in families with two to five members. An interesting new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine examines the risk of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to a susceptible individual who is part of a family with COVID-19 immunity. Study: Association Between Risk of COVID-19 Infection in Nonimmune Individuals and COVID-19 Immunity in Their Family

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How many people get ‘long COVID?’ More than half, researchers find.

Half of COVID survivors experience lingering symptoms six months after recovery More than half of the 236 million people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms — more commonly known as “long COVID” — up to six months after recovering, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The research

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Cell-based therapies for retinal diseases: review of clinical trials and direct to consumer “cell therapy” clinics

This review aims to outline the particular approaches in the different published clinical trials for cell-based therapies for retinal diseases. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is implicated in the pathophysiology of many retinal degenerative diseases. This cell layer is also an ideal target for cell-based therapies. Several early phase clinical trials evaluatingcell therapy approaches for

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CRISPR CAR-T cells can Revolutionize Cancer Treatment

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, taking half a million lives each year. CAR T technology has successfully harnessed the human immune system to produce awe-inspiring cancer remission rates. CRISPR-mediated genome engineering has enabled new developments in CAR T cells to bypass logistical, technical, and immunological roadblocks, making the

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Anti-Platelet Factor 4 Antibodies Causing VITT do not Cross-React with SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein

In Blood, Greinacher and colleagues examine humoral responses in vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) and COVID-19 to determine whether these illnesses are immunologically distinct or represent a disease continuum. At a surface level, vaccine-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT), a recently described complication of adenoviral-based COVID-19 vaccines, and COVID-19 have much in common. Both illnesses owe their origins to severe

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Convalescent plasma is “futile” as COVID-19 treatment for critically ill patients, trial published on JAMA shows

In the earliest days of the COVID-19 pandemic, the medical community turned to a century-old treatment: Take blood from recovered patients and give it to the sick. The hypothesis was that components in the so-called “convalescent plasma” that fought off the disease once could do it again, something that has worked in other diseases, such

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New study published in Pediatrics: more than 140,000 U.S. Children Lost Primary or Secondary Caregiver Due to Covid Pandemic

One U.S. child loses a parent or caregiver for every four COVID-19 deaths, a new modeling study published today in Pediatrics reveals.  The findings illustrate orphanhood as a hidden and ongoing secondary tragedy caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and emphasizes that identifying and caring for these children throughout their development is a necessary and urgent part of

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Internet hawkers of stem cell therapies for ocular diseases

Patients have been blinded or have experienced retinal detachments after treatment with so-called stem cell therapies such as intravitreal injections of autologous stem cells that are not FDA approved for many ocular conditions across the US and that were marketed directly to patients. Currently, the FDA has regulatory authority over such companies and since June

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Unapproved Stem Cell Therapies Harms Highlight Need for Greater Regulatory Enforcement

Unproven regenerative medical products have led to infections, disabilities and deaths Overview Stem cell products and other regenerative therapies have significant potential to treat traumatic injuries and serious diseases. Although some have earned approval from the Food and Drug Administration, most have not, and many of these unapproved interventions have led to life-threatening infections, chronic

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COVID-19 Booster Shots

More than 180 million Americans, including more than 80 percent of people over age 65, are fully vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 virus responsible for COVID-19. There’s no question that full vaccination is the best way to protect yourself against this devastating virus and reduce your chances of developing severe or long-lasting illness if you do

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Covid-19: 80% of young and >90% of adults in UK have antibodies: Office for National Statistics data suggest.

Around eight in ten young adults in the UK are now likely to have SARS-CoV-2 antibodies either from past infection or because they have been vaccinated, the latest survey from the Office for National Statistics has shown. The fortnightly bulletin on antibody and vaccination levels in the UK community population includes data to 13 August

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Two Alarms for Poor Prognosis After Rare VITT With AstraZeneca Jab

British doctors have identified two factors — very low platelet counts and brain bleeds — which they say dramatically increase the likelihood of a patient dying following the very rare but devastating side effect of vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (VITT) after the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (Oxford-AstraZeneca) vaccine. However, they believe that the surge in the VITT side

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NICE issues new COVID-19 rapid guideline on vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (VITT)

Patients who are acutely unwell with suspected vaccine induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (VITT) should be referred immediately to the emergency department, says new rapid guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Covid-19 rapid guideline: vaccine-induced immune thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (VITT) NICE guideline [NG200].

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SARS-CoV-2 activates lung epithelial cell proinflammatory signaling and leads to immune dysregulation in COVID-19 patients

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2), becomes a global threat to humanity. In severe COVID-19 patients, excessive proinflammatory responses and impaired host immune system are observed which could result in the progression of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and even death. In-depth investigation of SARS-CoV-2 infected

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A new study analyses the rate of thrombosis in children and adolescents hospitalized with COVID-19 or MIS-C

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with thrombotic complications in adults, but the incidence of COVID-19-related thrombosis in children and adolescents is unclear. Most children with acute COVID-19 have mild disease, but coagulopathy has been associated with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a postinfectious complication.

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EMA PRAC Concludes There is No Link Between Zynteglo and AML

EMA’s safety committee, PRAC, has concluded that there is no evidence linking the viral vector in Zynteglo to a blood cancer known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The European Medicines Agency’s (EMA’s) Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) has concluded that there is no evidence linking the viral vector in Zynteglo to a blood cancer known

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Delayed second dose and third doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine lead to heightened immune response

Research on the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19, also known as the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine, indicates that a long interval between first and second doses does not compromise the immune response after a late second dose. Additionally, a third dose of the vaccine continues to boost antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. The results were released in a preprint today. Delayed second dose The researchers

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The European Commission has identified the first five drug candidates as part of a new strategy to select the preferred treatments for COVID-19 in the EU.

Among the five therapeutic candidates identified are Eli Lilly’s repurposed arthritis medicine Olumiant (baricitinib) and investigational antibody drugs for early-stage COVID-19. This includes Lilly’s bamlanivimab and etesevimab combination, Roche and Regeneron’s REGEN-COV (casirivimab and imdevimab), Celltrion’s regdanivimab and GlaxoSmithKline/Vir Biotech’s sotrovimab. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) is currently assessing an application for the extension of

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Are COVID-19 vaccines effective against hospital admission with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant ?

Vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates against symptomatic disease with the Delta (B.1.617.2) variant have been recently reported. After a full course, VE reached 88% with the Pfizer/BioNTech BNT162b2 vaccine and 67% with the AstraZeneca ChAdOx1 AZD1222 vaccine. This provided important evidence that despite modest reductions in protection, vaccines remain effective against Delta. However, the very recent

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Tokyo University of Science Scientists Find Drug Duo That May Cure COVID-19 Together

Preclinical experiments show that the drugs cepharanthine and nelfinavir may be effective treatments for COVID-19 While preventative care for COVID-19 has made much noise (with vaccines having rolled out in most countries), the soaring infection rates indicate the need for effective treatments. Using cultured cells to study SARS-CoV-2 infections, researchers at the Tokyo University of

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Gene therapy appears more cost effective than current treatments for severe hemophilia B

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital provides the first gene therapy manufacturing and distribution cost report for hemophilia B. A St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital analysis found a major gap between the cost to manufacture and distribute hemophilia B gene therapy and the $2 million-plus price reportedly under consideration for hemophilia gene therapy now in development. The study appeared

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A new report on Pediatrics details 7 cases of myocarditis after COVID-19 vaccination

A new report takes a close look at seven teen boys who developed myocarditis after COVID-19 vaccination, each of whom had similar symptoms, timing and outcomes. While health officials investigate whether vaccination caused this condition, Judith A. Guzman-Cottrill, D.O., a corresponding author of the report, said she hoped the report would raise clinicians’ awareness to suspect

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Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine recipients have lower antibody levels targeting the Delta variant first discovered in India

Levels of antibodies in the blood of vaccinated people that are able to recognise and fight the new SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant first discovered in India (B.1.617.2) are on average lower than those against previously circulating variants in the UK, according to new laboratory data from the Francis Crick Institute and the National Institute for Health Research

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A Novel Form of Macrophage-based Immunotherapy Developed by Georgia State University Has the Potential to Revolutionize Cancer Treatment

A novel form of macrophage-based immunotherapy is effective at treating a broad spectrum of cancers, including those at advanced stages, according to a groundbreaking study led by Georgia State immunology professor Yuan Liu.  Liu’s treatment works by leveraging macrophages, specialized white blood cells involved in the detection and elimination of cancer cells and other pathogens. Macrophages also activate

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Tracking SARS-CoV-2 variants

All viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, change over time. Most changes have little to no impact on the virus’ properties. However, some changes may affect the virus’s properties, such as how easily it spreads, the associated disease severity, or the performance of vaccines, therapeutic medicines, diagnostic tools, or other public health and social measures.  WHO, in collaboration with partners, expert networks, national authorities,

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Deep Pharma Intelligence Releases Analytical Report “Cell Therapies In Healthcare Landscape Overview 2021”

Deep Pharma Intelligence released a special 115-page analytical report Cell Therapies In Healthcare Landscape Overview 2021 (Stem Cells and CAR-Ts), which is the first comprehensive and systematic overview of cell therapies landscape by the company. This report is specifically focused on Stem Cell therapies and Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapies, and it is the first

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Scientific evidence that informed UK Government’s response to COVID-19 including first lockdown is published in Royal Society Special Theme issue

Scientific evidence that was used to inform the UK government’s key policies impacting millions of people during the first wave of COVID-19 including the rule of six and the first national stay-at-home order is published today [31 May] in the journal of the Royal Society. The Special Theme issue is compiled and guest edited by

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German researchers say Vaccine induced Thrombosis is caused by adenovirus vector and can be fixed

AstraZeneca continues to discuss the cause of rare blood clots with regulators and scientists after German researchers said they discovered the link to its Covid-19 vaccines. The U.K. pharma company said the theory put forward by the Goethe University laboratory in Frankfurt on Wednesday is one of many that AstraZeneca scientists are investigating. “We are continuing to

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