Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome

Researchers at Western University have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria. Published today in Nature Communications, this study opens up the possibility of using CRISPR to alter the makeup of the human microbiome in a way that could be personalized

Read More


Disrupting the gut microbiome may affect some immune responses to flu vaccination

Source NIH The normal human gut microbiome is a flourishing community of microorganisms, some of which can affect the human immune system. In a new paper published this week in Cell, researchers found that oral antibiotics, which can kill gut microorganisms, can alter the human immune response to seasonal influenza vaccination. The work was led by

Read More


An Organ-On-A-Chip Engineered Platform to Study the Microbiota–Gut–Brain Axis in Neurodegeneration

A Novel Hypothesis: The Microbiota–Gut–Brain Axis The two most common neurodegenerative disorders have a very long history. The first reported case of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was in 1906, while Parkinson’s disease (PD) was described in 1817. Since then, intensive research has provided plenty of clinical, genetic, and molecular evidence of AD and PD signs, mechanisms,

Read More


Microbiome Physiology Can Now Be Studied In Vitro Using Organ Chip Technology

Source Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard The human microbiome, the huge collection of microbes that live inside and on our body, profoundly affects human health and disease. The human gut flora in particular, which harbor the densest number of microbes, not only break down nutrients and release molecules important for our survival

Read More


Fecal Microbiota for Transplantation: Safety Communication- Risk of Serious Adverse Reactions Due to Transmission of Multi-Drug Resistant Organisms

The FDA is now aware of bacterial infections caused by multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs) that have occurred due to transmission of a MDRO from use of investigational fecal microbiota for transplantation (FMT): Two immunocompromised adults who received investigational FMT developed invasive infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (E.coli). One of the individuals died. FMT

Read More